Sept. 17, 1940, in The Star: Municipal elections were conducted yesterday [Monday] in Piedmont, Jacksonville and Oxford and only in Jacksonville will a runoff election Sept. 26 be necessary under terms of a new law regulating city elections. Dr. T. B. Howle, one-time mayor of Oxford, was elected over the incumbent, Carl Pace, and another candidate. All city council candidates regarded as members of the Howle slate were elected. The mayoral runoff in Jacksonville will be between Allen C. Shelton and Charles A. Stephens, a former mayor. The incumbent, Grover Currier, was apparently not popular, for he came in third. The mayor of Piedmont will be Z. Scoggin. Also this date: Campaigning in Kansas, Republican presidential candidate Wendell L. Willkie said it’s imperative for the health of American democracy that the current power structure be removed from Washington. Leaving President Roosevelt and his people in office would result in “an American totalitarian government before the long third term is finished,” Willkie predicted.

Sept. 17, 1990, in The Star: Local justice joins the computer age in January when Calhoun County becomes the first county in the state to use a new computerized court reporting system. Circuit Judge Sam Monk and his court reporter, Parian Tidwell, have agreed to try the new system, which will provide an almost instantaneous transcript of the trial. As the court reporter takes notes as usual on a stenography machine, the information is fed into a main computer that translates the keystrokes into readable English. “We basically chose Anniston because here we have a visionary judge and a highly qualified court reporter who were willing to do it,” said Debby Garrett, president-elect of the Alabama Court Reporters Association. Her organization is paying to bring the system to Calhoun County.

Loading...
Loading...