Jan. 6, 1944, in The Star: The body of an Army flier was being held at Fort McClellan today while military authorities at both the fort and at the Anniston Army Air Base were trying to determine his identity and where he might have taken off before crashing at Bald Rock in Cheaha State park day before yesterday. Two young boys living in the vicinity of the park heard what they believed to have been an airplane crash and the next day discovered the wreckage when they went to investigate. The flier is thought to have been alone in the craft. Also this date: The state’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Board operates two liquor stores in Mobile: One is exclusively for male patrons, the other is exclusively for women.

Jan. 6, 1994, in The Star: The words of Montgomery Advertiser newspaper editor Grover C. Hall are again being heard in the capital city as the Alabama Shakespeare Festival presents Grover, a play written by Randy Hall of Anniston, who is Grover’s grand-nephew. Randy says he heard many stories about his great-uncle while growing up and used them as a framework for his play. The title character is portrayed by an Alabama actor named Stuart Culpepper, who himself has a rich background in the journalism of the early civil rights era. Culpepper’s personal sympathies at the time were with the segregationists, but the young man wrote articles for the Advertiser fairly, and with balance for both sides. “At one time, I was the only journalist in Alabama that both Gov. John Patterson and Martin Luther King would talk to,” Culpepper said. Grover is the first work by an Alabama playwright ever to be performed by the Alabama Shakespeare Festival.

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