Jan. 28, 1944, in The Star: Anniston and Atlanta have been established as station points for broadcasts of information between the Alabama Highway Patrol and the Georgia State Patrol. A receiver tuned to the Georgia radio system was installed in the Anniston office of the Highway Patrol yesterday afternoon and a receiver tuned to the Alabama radio system was installed the same day in the Atlanta office of the GSP. The two stations will talk to each other occasionally and of course will do so as long as necessary in the event of an emergency. For what it’s worth, Alabama’s system is newer and has more modern equipment. 

Jan. 28, 1994, in The Star: As host of its first-ever Super Bowl, Atlanta is promoting its devotion to both Southern hospitality and commerce full tilt — after all, the Olympics are coming in two years and everyone needs some practice time for a Big Event. The city’s major airport is decorated with thousands of Super Bowl balloons and welcome banners, beneath which a greeter dressed as a giant peach chirps, “Hi, y’all, welcome to Atlanta.” Fans at the Georgia World Congress Center escaped the cold, wet and windy outdoors by playing around at the “NFL Experience,” a traveling sideshow for all things football (a column by The Star’s Geoff Calkins offers insights on it). Players for the Cowboys and the Bills — apparently there is a football game attached to this commercial spectacle — practiced most of the day, so their hotels are quiet. Most of the action centered on the Hyatt Regency Atlanta, headquarters for the NFL and the media. There, you weren’t always sure who was who, but everyone acted important. Also this date: GCO Apparel, formerly Lamar Manufacturing Co., might shut down its Heflin plant two months from now, leaving 64 workers without jobs. Employees were given written notice of the possible shut-down — a corporate obligation by federal law — although company officials hope that business will pick up in the meantime. Unfortunately, demand for suits and sports coats the factory makes has fallen as some offices move toward a more casual atmosphere, sartorially speaking.

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