May 21, 1944, in The Star: At the intersection of Gurnee Avenue and 10th Street, a Model City landmark is being ushered into oblivion as workmen destroy the remains of the old Parker House hotel. Ending a life of 60 years in Anniston, the hotel, patronized by the elite when it was built in 1884, goes to its end under the name of The Lindbergh Hotel, a place for black residents and travelers to stay. In between, it was also known as the Eagle Hotel, with assorted scandals along the way contributing to its decline. It was also the scene of the murders of two Anniston policemen who were on duty trying to catch a notorious bootlegger. After the hotel’s remains are cleared away, an ordinary one-story building will take its place. Also this date: Clyde’s Cafe’, located at 19 W. 11th St., is now under the management of “Mr. B” (the B standing for “Bartholomew), who, according to the advertisement, was previously with the Jeff Davis Coffee Shop.   

May 21, 1994, in The Star: Piedmont has lost its latest try to legalize pull tabs in Calhoun County. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled yesterday that it agreed with a November decision by Calhoun County Circuit Judge Joel Laird that pull tabs are illegal. They are, he said, not a form of bingo but rather an illegal lottery, under Alabama law. Pull tabs are small cardboard squares with covered faces. When players rip off the cover, they know instantly if they have won.

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