April 28, 1944, in The Star: The Emory Pipe and Foundry Company in Oxanna, considered to be one of the largest and most modern plants in the vicinity, has been purchased by Frank Hamilton and associates from W. C. Wilson of Anniston. Plans for the re-opening of the plant, which shut down during the latter part of 1943, were not disclosed. It had been built in 1920 by Wilson and a group of other industrialists. Also this date: The party primary elections next week will be carried out in part by the use of 10 voting machines at specific locations, such as at City Hall and the high school, while regular paper ballots will be used in other places. This marks the second election in which voting machines have been used in Anniston. Additionally: A full page advertisement from the U.S. senatorial campaign of Jim Simpson condemns his incumbent opponent in the Democratic primary, Lister Hill, for being quiet on “the race question.” This means Simpson thinks Hill should be vocal on that issue and speak out against all federal entities and cultural influences that might compel the South to integrate in any form -- and he faults Hill (and anyone else like him) for not doing so. “I will lead the fight for the right of states to establish and enforce their segregation laws,” Simpson says.

April 28, 1994, in The Star: Protesters agreed to leave the offices of the Randolph County School Board, in Wedowee, after a five-hour demonstration when the superintendent agreed to investigate charges of retaliation against black students. The protesters demanded that Superintendent Dale McKay ensure that teachers would not target students who recently attended the “freedom schools” set up at local churches for students boycotting Randolph County High School. The protest ended when McKay did compose a memo for teachers that addressed protesters' worries. (They were protesting the reinstatement of Principal Hulond Humphries following a race-based controversy.)

Loading...
Loading...