Jan. 12, 1944, in The Star: From an editorial: “Piedmont’s Y. M. C. A. stands as a credit to our sister in the Northern part of our county. The Standard-Coosa Company did a noble thing for their community when they established this center for the young people of Piedmont. It has paid dividends in many ways. We have an idea that a similar organization is in the minds of many Annistonians for after the war.” The writer suggests that an existing building here could be converted or otherwise adopted for this long-needed function. [At this time, a YMCA organization existed in Anniston, but only for the purpose of operating a USO station at 112 E. 12th St. for the military community.]

Jan. 12, 1994, in The Star: Saying the application was incomplete, the state’s health planning agency board yesterday nixed a proposal by Stringfellow Memorial Hospital to provide lithotripsy services for patients with kidney stones. (Lithotripsy uses shock waves to break up kidney stones and is not available around here.) A staff employee of the agency in Montgomery said Stringfellow had failed to provide information such as how much patients would be billed for the service and the effect of the service on the hospital’s finances. Stringfellow administrator Michael Cassidy said the hospital is “astounded and flabbergasted” by the board’s decision. The hospital’s marketing and community relations director, Julie Tanber, said hospital officials believed the application was in fact complete, and that if it had not been, they would not have filed it.

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