Nov. 1, 1944, in The Star: Miss Mary St. Clair Woodruff, one of the city’s most outstanding educators and for years a leader in the cultural live of the community, died yesterday evening after an illness of about a month. She had made her home with her sister, Mrs. E. M. Martin, at 800 Quintard Avenue. Funeral services will be tomorrow morning at Parker Memorial Baptist. Miss Woodruff was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Woodruff, pioneer residents of Anniston. Holder of multiple degrees, she taught at the old Anniston College for Young Ladies and then at Anniston High School. Also this date: People are finding places to live, according to the “Personals” column. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Magel and Barbara Magel are now at home at 1401 Christine Ave., Mr. and Mrs. John Bailey and Miss Martha Bailey will occupy the bungalow at 1826 Rocky Hollow Road, and Dr. and Mrs. Paul D. Vann are moving into their new home at 1106 Quintard Ave.

Nov. 1, 1994, in The Star: On a balmy Halloween night perfect for trick-or-treating, Lisa Jones was at the Carver Community Center’s annual “pumpkin patch party” with her three children, Cordney, Corderrious and Derrionte Murphy. In their 15th year, the parties at each of Anniston’s five community centers seem to be gaining in popularity. “The No. 1 reason for the parties is that they’re a safe place to go,” said Jon Holder of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department. Of course, thanks in part to the mild weather, Glenwood Terrace drew a larger-than-usual crowd, and Woodstock Avenue in front of the high school saw a good crowd, too. Also this date: Anniston’s new trolley service, featuring two forest-green vehicles bought from Atlanta, kicked off yesterday. The trolleys will run a regular route on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will add a Saturday route for Christmas shopping. Ten key downtown locations will be included on a 25-minute schedule.

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