Jan. 20, 1944, in The Star: Two nursery schools for white children and one nursery school for black children will be set up in Anniston through federal funds, it was learned today through Congressman Sam Hobbs’ office. The centers for white children will be operated at First Presbyterian Church and at the Glen Addie public housing project. Suitable quarters for the center for black children have not yet been found. All that’s known so far about the operation of the centers is that there will be minor charges for a lunchtime meal. Also this date: The Birmingham News and the Age-Herald announced today that the newspapers would lodge a formal protest with the War Department and the Office of Censorship, charging that reporters were barred from the scene of the crash of an Army bomber in the Birmingham area, on private property, and that a photographer’s camera was confiscated by an officer. The crash on Jan. 18, and news coverage thereof, is of considerable interest because it claimed the lives of nine people.

Jan. 20, 1994, in The Star: A space heater left on at B&A Manufacturing Co. in Weaver is thought to have been the cause of a blaze yesterday afternoon that destroyed about 30 percent of the apparel plant, which employs 67. B&A co-owners Shelbie Ann Brown and Barbara Ann Broome had sent their employees home early yesterday morning because it was too cold to work. Several space heaters were intentionally left on to keep the premises tolerably warm for work today. The company occupied the plant that had formerly been the home of Sandra Sportswear, which had closed in August 1992.

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