March 28, 1944, in The Star: Solicitation for the Crippled Children’s Funds campaign, which got under way in Anniston’s residential section last week, will begin this week in downtown Anniston, according to the president of the women’s civic club that’s sponsoring the drive. Treatment for children with crippled arms and legs and other infirmities that can be corrected is made possible through this fund. Also this date: More than 30,000 prisoners of war are now being profitably employed in seven Southeastern states, the Fourth Service Command Headquarters announced today. These enemy captives in some cases ease the shortage of labor for non-combat jobs at Army posts (e.g., at laundries and bakeries), while in other situations they are needed by private industry or agricultural interests.

March 28, 1994, in The Star: One of the most profound catastrophes to ever strike in Calhoun County came in the form of a tornado yesterday shortly before noon. The violent wind ruined property and transformed lives from Ragland to Piedmont. At Goshen United Methodist Church, 21 people died from injuries, including eight children, and at least 83 were injured, according to Piedmont police officer Blake Strickland. Many bodies from the church were taken to the National Guard Armory in Piedmont: “Gently, a worker wiped the small boy’s pale face. After he had finished, he and two more men slowly lifted the lifeless child and slid him into the black bag. With a zip, the boy was covered. The bottom of the bag was rolled up several times to fit its occupant’s size. It was never meant to hold anything so small.”

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