March 22, 1944, in The Star: One hundred seventy-seven girls attended the initial meeting of the Junior Hostess Course at the USO-YMCA last night. Miss Christine McClellan acted as master of ceremonies and introduced Miss Phyllis Gates as the first speaker. Miss Gates’ subject was “Why a Junior Hostess Course?” Miss Dorotha Squirer, the director, stressed that the USO-YMCA is trying to plan activities to meet the needs and interests of all girls – from Army wives to local young ladies, as well as those who have come to Anniston to work in war industries. Another speaker, Miss Mildred Goodrich, talked about attractions in Anniston in general.

March 22, 1994, in The Star: Yesterday afternoon 34 mounted African animals arrived by truck at the Anniston Museum of Natural History, expanding what was already one of the largest such collections in the Southeast. The animals were a gift from the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, which had housed the collection for a number of years. “They are changing their collection priorities, and told us we were the logical choice [to take the collection],” said Patrick L. Ralston, registrar of the Anniston museum. He said no modifications will be needed to the museum’s physical plant to accommodate the specimens. Also this date: Thanks to a small-business grant, the median strip of Glenwood Terrace in Anniston is now home to a host of newly planted dogwood trees.

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