Oct. 29, 1944, in The Star: Reaction of patients to the new Anniston Memorial Hospital has been unusually good, and operation the institution by the staff is going forward without a hitch. Patients are commenting on the quietness which prevails — there are no elevators, clanging and banging of doors — and on the warm, homelike atmosphere to be found. Patients’ response to treatment is better than it was in the older, outmoded structure that was Garner Hospital. Visiting hours are 1 to 3 p.m. and 7 to 8:30 p.m. daily, with a maximum of two visitors at any given moment. Also this date: A Court of Honor was held recently at Seventeenth Street Baptist Church for black boys who are members of Boy Scout troops in Anniston. Dr. J. C. White presided. Troop 305, of the First Congregational Church, was presented its troop charter for the coming year by Prof. C. E. Hanna, commissioner. Troop 305 is the oldest black Boy Scout troop in Anniston, its troop charter being presented in 1936. Additionally: The Calhoun County Board of Education has approved eliminating three more one-teacher schools. The school at Four Mile will have its children transported to Weaver, while the students attending Hollingsworth and Nance’s Creek will bid farewell to their school houses and start attending White Plains. And one more: In newsy notes from Anniston High School, we learn that Nan Triplett, a sub-freshman, has been designated Pupil of the Week. She’s well known and liked, and she also serves on the Student Council.

Oct. 29, 1994, in The Star: A number of high school football games last night ended as shutouts. Wellborn, the No. 2-ranked team in Class 5A, beat Saks 35-0; Anniston defeated Tuscaloosa County 28-0, generating 349 yards of offense in the process; Oxford improved its record to 5-3 with a 35-0 win of its own, over Southside; and Alexandria defeated Munford 18-0, with Mac Campbell contributing 125 yards on 25 carries that included two touchdowns.

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