Feb. 2, 1944, in The Star: Jacksonville residents have far exceeded their $80,000 quota in the Fourth American War Loan Drive and with a total of $150,000 already amassed, are well on their way to doubling their goal for this campaign. Under the direction of A. C. Shelton, these citizens have announced they are determined to hit the $160,000 mark by the end of the week. Jacksonville schools have their own campaign leaders; at the high school, for example, Mrs. Reuben Self and O. W. Barron are directing the program, while in the schools for black children, Eugene Reid, Joe Odum, Mary Ramey, Theo Fox and Hugh M. Reed, as well as the schools’ teachers, are working on the campaign.

Feb. 2, 1994, in The Star: At a town meeting last night, Jacksonville residents got their first look at what form a revamped Public Square might take. Reactions to the plans were underwhelming, with some saying there’s too much concrete. “There are some strong feelings about keeping it much like the way it is,” said Calvin Warren, owner of West Hardware on the square. The centerpiece of the park, a memorial to Confederate soldiers, would remain in place, but most everything else would change. For example, a two-foot-high concrete platform for performances would be built at the north end, and sugar maple trees would line the east and west sides. To be taken out would be two machine guns, an artillery piece and two circular fountains. Also this date: At a fundraising kickoff dinner last night in Oxford, the leadership and supporters of area Boy Scouts raised about 65 percent of their $245,000 goal to keep the organization operational in an 11-county area, serving 10,800 scouts. The campaign will last through May 11, said Choccolocco Council Executive Director Bill Manning. The council was almost dissolved in 1991 due to a $250,000 debt, but that amount has been whittled down to about $38,000.

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