Feb. 11, 1944, in The Star: Will Ball, owner and operator of a restaurant in Anniston for more than 30 years, died at his home last night after a long illness. Mr. Ball was a member of the 17th Street Baptist Church, and during recent years had served as supply pastor for many black congregations in the county. Funeral arrangements will be announced later by Lucius. Also this date: Despite the urgings directed at all residents in recent weeks, Calhoun County is falling short in its obligation to buy Series E War Bonds. The quota for this county is a little more than $1.22 million, but just over $805,000 worth has been bought so far in a campaign which runs only three more days. “If we fall short on this quota, we will be branded as a county that has failed to meet its obligation to her men in service,” said War Finance Chairman Howard Cater. Additionally: Workmen are busy installing the United Press printer in the newsroom at WHMA radio in Anniston and the device is expected to go in service in a couple of days. With this special radio wire, 24-hour service in news and other events will be available through the voices of WHMA. It means people throughout the region will get news more quickly and more frequently.

Feb. 11, 1994, in The Star: Alabama’s wilderness protection project, Forever Wild, received its first donation of land — a bald eagle habitat near Lake Guntersville. Conservation officials yesterday announced the gift of 209 acres to Forever Wild from the Nature Conservancy, which received the Marshall County tract from Monsanto Co. The acreage borders Lake Guntersville. “We could not have prayed for a better first acquisition than this,” state Conservation Commissioner Charley S. Grimsley said.

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