Sept. 3, 1943, in The Star: “The Anniston Warehouse Corporation” is the name of a new subsidiary of Chrysler Corporation, the entity which has taken over operation of Anniston Army Depot, it was announced at a press conference this afternoon. E. C. Row, an executive of Chrysler Corporation, has taken over his duties as general manager at the depot. He’s a native of Detroit, Mich., home city of Chrysler Corporation. Anniston is the fifth Army Ordnance Department Depot to be turned over by contract to private operation within the past few weeks. Col. Webster Capron, commanding officer of the depot, said the changeover is experimental and represents standard Ordnance Department policy to always seek new ways to advance efficiency with money and manpower. Also this date: Funeral services will be conducted day after tomorrow at Oxford Methodist Church for Thomas Andrew Anderson, a widely known educator and administrator who died this morning at his home on College Hill, Oxford, at the age of 83. He was born in February, 1860, into a family whose forebears had settled in the county in 1834. Mr. Anderson spent portions of his long career in Nacogdoches, Texas, and in Sylacauga. At the time of his death he had been principal of Oxford City School since 1922.

Sept. 3, 1993, in The Star: Calhoun County residents will feel the cost of federal regulation of landfills in October. That’s when the county closes its landfill, raises garbage fees for those living in unincorporated areas and initiates a set of disposal fees. Calhoun County commissioners said this morning that as of Oct. 9, Calhoun County trash will be hauled to a federally regulated landfill in Moody. Household pickup for county residents will rise from $6.15 a month to $9.95. Even those who take their own trash to the landfill will have to pay what amounts to a dumping fee, starting at $3 for what one might reasonably carry in a car. Also this date: Stringfellow Memorial Hospital currently has about 280 full- and part-time employees, but lower revenue from fewer cases of in-patient care is now forcing layoffs. Administrator Michael Cassidy said the cutbacks are mostly administrative and are not expected to affect patient care. Eight people are being laid off, 10 others will work fewer hours and 12 vacancies will simply not be filled.

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