War Bond

At this time (1944) War Bond sales campaigns spared no feelings in their goal of persuading people to help pay for the American war effort with their own cash. Blunt advertisements such as this were sometimes sponsored by a single business, while larger ads with the same type of message were sponsored by several, typically listed at the bottom.

Feb. 13, 1944, in The Star: In connection with “Boy Scout Week,” two pages of Scout news bring out the fact that the local organization, the Choccolocco Council of Boy Scouts, is approaching its 25th anniversary, having been organized under the sponsorship of the Anniston Rotary Club in 1920. Next year’s celebratory plans have not taken any form, but the council’s executive committee will soon discuss setting up a subcommittee in charge of that project. The Choccolocco Council consists of 145 troops and 22 Cub packs. Total number of Scouts, Cubs and leaders is reported to be 3,951. Scouting is also available to black boys of the region; a total of 564 boys — 510 Scouts in 31 troops, and 54 Cubs in four packs — enjoy the benefits of Scouting here. Dr. Melton Clark is chairman of the Interracial Scouting Committee for the Choccolocco Council. [It was not clear from the reporting whether the 3,951 figure included black Boy Scouts in this segregated era.]

Feb. 13, 1994, in The Star: After a decade of studies and scrounging for money, Anniston’s western bypass, proposed to connect Alabama 202 with I-20, could be just one study away from being built. Engineers and geologists tracking the water that bubbles up at Coldwater Spring say they have almost finished that study, an analysis of whether the bypass would threaten Anniston’s water supply. Short answer: probably not. Still, the water board wants to make extra-certain the digging work won’t endanger the spring.

Loading...
Loading...