July 6, 1944, in The Star: In an interview with The Star, an Anniston Chamber of Commerce official said he expects healthy but orderly growth in Anniston after the war, particularly in the area of housing construction. “Statistics and facts determined by the Federal Housing Authority and by the Chamber of Commerce prove that we have not overbuilt, and this steady grown of new houses justifies our normal growth,” said Chamber president Charles Varn. He said it’s expected that postwar demand will require that 225 to 250 houses be built annually. Varn was also pleased that all the industries located here will be able to resume their typical pre-war production; no operation will be idled on account of having produced something needed exclusively for prosecution of the war. “Those persons who carry the opinion that Anniston is a ‘boomtown’ or a ‘wartown’ will find after the war that they are sadly mistaken,” Varn said. Anniston’s population now is approximately 40,000, compared to 22,345 in 1930. Soldier personnel are not counted as part of the larger figure. Also this date: The Barber Terrace apartments and houses are completed and ready for occupancy, according to J. D. Crow, director of the Anniston Housing Authority. Eighty black families involved in defense work will live there — 42 apartments have been created in the large brick building formerly used as Barber Memorial Seminary and an additional 38 small houses have been erected nearby in south Anniston. Rental price will range from $19 per month to $39 per month.

July 6, 1994, in The Star: Tickets to see the Rolling Stones in Birmingham Aug. 6 are priced at three levels: $50, $39.50 and $25, plus a $4 “service fee” per ticket. But a couple of 20-somethings interviewed say that’s out of their price range and they’ll spend their money elsewhere. Also this date: The Anniston City Council has a couple of big projects it’s pursuing to benefit Anniston residents, but the projects’ initial cost estimates have come in higher than expected. One project is the construction of a pavilion, brick walkway and other landscaping improvements at Zinn Park, while the other is the conversion of the former supermarket in the 1600 block of Noble Street into a city convention center that would replace the City Auditorium. “I don’t think we’ll endorse either project as it exists right now,” said Mayor David Dethrage.

Loading...
Loading...