Aug. 24, 1944, in The Star: Equipped with a new 14-room building, a new lunchroom and an enlarged library, Anniston High School will soon open for the 1944-45 term to handle not just the usual functions of a modern high school, but also supplemental courses in defense training which have been added to the curriculum during the war years. Technically opened for use during the second semester of the previous year, the new building is also the storage repository for all the materials a teacher might need in her lesson plan. Domestic arts and sciences, i.e. cooking and sewing, will also be taught there. All the classrooms in the new building are arranged with long tables replacing the old desks. Also this date: In other public school news — for this issue contains many stories and photographs related to the imminent start of the new school term — it’s noted that Miss Lois Carson, a teacher in the Anniston system for the past 20 years, will be the new principal of Wilmer Avenue School. She succeeds Mrs. John J. Nash, who served only a short time before urgent home duties required that she resign. Additionally: Here’s a record that’ll be hard to beat. The beginning of the school year marks Miss Neva Evins’ 45th year as a teacher, virtually all those years within the Calhoun County system. She has taught all grades, but this year is teaching 5th grade at DeArmanville.

Aug. 24, 1994, in The Star: Just across Alabama 202 from Gauldin’s Sports Center, Jacksonville State University archaeologists and volunteers have been working, according to terms of a state contract, to excavate the site for Native American artifacts before it’s bulldozed to make way for the western bypass. They have found pottery shards, seeds hundreds of years old, arrow and spear points and the apparent remains of a 19th century home beneath the dirt. The site appears to be that of a village some 2,000 years old.

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