Look Back ... to an introduction to the internet, 1994

July 28, 1944, in The Star: Expressing a doubt as to the sincerity of the recent Junker revolt in Germany, Ralph Heinzen, former manager for the United Press news service in France, told a USO audience in Anniston that the Germany of 1918 is different from the Germany of today. German people today are far from admitting lasting defeat and will have to be forced into an unconditional surrender that will give the Allies control over her industrial activity for many years to come. Mr. Heinzen’s visit to Anniston was under the auspices of this newspaper; he was introduced by business manager Ralph Callahan and formally welcomed by City Commission Chairman Gerald King. Also this date: Some in Congress believe that when the body reconvenes next week, members need to anticipate early consideration of legislation related to reconversion and demobilization of the U.S. war machine. Some believe it’s possible the German war effort could soon collapse. [The end of war in Europe was still more than nine months in the future.]  

July 28, 1994, in The Star: In its weekly entertainment section, The Star takes a extensive look at the internet, explaining its features and activities to the average reader. In the process, it notes the following: “The Anniston Star is now on line with The Internet and even has two separate addresses. Letters to the editor may be sent to mcnt63a@prodigy.com. Other correspondence for our writers and editors may be sent to newsstar@aol.com.” The article states that getting hooked up to the internet is no big deal. Anyone with a PC, a modem and about $10 a month can link up to some of the major internet services through one of the commercial computer services, such as America Online, Prodigy and CompuServe. The article also lists the five major functions that are available to current users: e-mail, mailing lists, newsgroups, databases and file transfer.

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