Oct. 12, 1944, in The Star: In a news article where the writer was obviously given some leeway to express a viewpoint, we’re told that the new youth club recreation center on the third floor of the Radio Building will benefit from contributions made to the ongoing Community Chest drive. “At long last – and it appears to have taken a second World War to initiate it – something is being done to meet the recreational needs of Anniston’s teen-age youth. After incredible years of blindly ignoring this vital, urgent problem – although other cities had long made strides toward solving it through school or church groups – adult Annistonians seem to have awakened to the fact that teen-agers not only like to dance, but will dance, either in a planned, respectable center, or, if driven, in the dubious juke joint, the public dance hall, the questionable road house.”

Oct. 12, 1994, in The Star: The Anniston City Council has decided to buy the old Winn Dixie building at 17th and Noble for $660,000 and spend more than $900,000 to convert it into a new city auditorium and convention center. A main banquet room will seat between 1,000 and 1,200 people, while smaller groups will be accommodated in five individual meeting rooms. A new convention center will make City Auditorium redundant – but available to the federal government in case it wants to move U.S. Bankruptcy Court offices there and into the rest of City Hall. Of course, if things get that far, city officials will have to decide whether to build a new municipal complex or relocate to an existing building. Also this date: Food World, with Anniston locations on North Pelham Road and South Quintard Avenue, advertises that all its checkout lanes now boast “Swipeout,” which allows the customer to pay for groceries at the checkout using an ATM or credit card. Swipe the card through a special machine, punch in your PIN and you’re done.

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