All for one, sort of

Although the nation was supposed to be united in its effort to fight the enemy overseas in World War II, unity didn't extend to the races at home. White-enforced segregation was just too entrenched. As a new war bond drive kicked off nationally, Anniston's black community, including its businesses, was expected to do its own share of fundraising. At the bottom of a large advertisement which urged black citizens to join the war bonds effort, some of Anniston's black-owned and -patronized businesses were listed.

Sept. 16, 1943, in The Star: The Boy Scouts of Troop 15 will soon move into a new cement-block, steel-frame-windowed meeting house that they build themselves — but first they have to tear down their present old “home.” That structure, some 50 years old, was once the city hall of the town of Oxanna, an area now known as south Anniston. It has also been Troop 15’s home for the past 23 years, and in that time has become a storehouse of photographs, handiwork and other memorabilia from a venerable troop still led by its founder, A. P. “Cap” Ezell. Regarded as beyond repair, however, the building is located between Noble Street and Wilmer Avenue on F Street.

Sept. 16, 1993, in The Star: A person or persons entered a man’s property in the Woodchase subdivision of Saks and killed his six rare and friendly Angora goats. The property owner, Richard Corkan of Timbercrest Circle, said he realized something might be wrong yesterday morning when the tame, harmless animals weren’t waiting to be fed. He walked through the pasture where they stayed and discovered they had all been shot to death.

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