Rick Bragg — Pulitzer prize-winning newspaperman, best-selling author, native son — has a new book coming out Oct. 27: “Where I Come From: Stories from the Deep South.” It’s a collection of the humorous columns he’s written in recent years, mostly for “Southern Living” and “Garden & Gun”…

    Entertainment comes in a variety of packages. Reading an interesting historical novel is one package to unwrap in order to enter a different world far away, while the plant sale during August at the Anniston Museums’ Botanical Gardens can offer the fun of selecting lively colors and shapes f…

    We first took a look at “The Ickabog,” J. K. Rowling’s new work for young readers, after 19 weekday chapters had been published online. Since the book was being published in “installments,” it was decided that this column should review the book in “installments,” too, joking, “New ways of pu…

    To think of the stories of Edgar Allan Poe is to experience at least one incontrovertible shudder. How can an early story like “The Masque of the Red Death” so ably reference our current pandemic? How can a late story like “The Cask of Amontillado” make us laugh so willingly at another perso…

    Both “The Minister’s Black Veil” and “The Birth-mark,” two of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic short stories, reflect the author’s concern with what are often identified as the opposing forces of religion and science. They are both forces in which Hawthorne finds potential danger and potential …

    Any reader is going to immediately smile remembering “Rip Van Winkle,” Washington Irving’s legendary yarn of the Catskills. Most readers will probably not even recognize “My Kinsman, Major Molineux” as one of the many tales from Nathaniel Hawthorne.