Editorial: Up in smoke in Colorado — Legalized marijuana sales is huge change in U.S. drug laws
by The Anniston Star Editorial Board
Jan 01, 2014 | 2228 views |  0 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cheyenne Fox attaches radio frequency tracking tags, required by law, to maturing pot plants inside a grow house, at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver, Tuesday Dec. 31, 2013. Colorado is making final preparations for marijuana sales to begin Jan. 1, a day some are calling "Green Wednesday." 3D Cannabis Center will be open as a recreational retail outlet on New Year's Day, Photo: Brennan Linsley/The Associated Press
Cheyenne Fox attaches radio frequency tracking tags, required by law, to maturing pot plants inside a grow house, at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver, Tuesday Dec. 31, 2013. Colorado is making final preparations for marijuana sales to begin Jan. 1, a day some are calling "Green Wednesday." 3D Cannabis Center will be open as a recreational retail outlet on New Year's Day, Photo: Brennan Linsley/The Associated Press
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The United States’ latest experiment with legalized marijuana sales has started, though there’s little chance Alabama will take part in this modern revolution in America’s stance on drugs.

It’s now legal in two states — Colorado and Washington — to buy and sell marijuana for recreational use. Washington’s “pot stores” don’t open until this summer, but many of the 136 licensed marijuana stores in Colorado opened Wednesday. Coloradoans can buy up to one ounce of pot at a time; out-of-state buyers are restricted to a quarter of an ounce.

Alabama, along with virtually all of its Deep South brethren, isn’t Colorado or Washington state. In other words, conservative voters and politicians here are likely to see this sweeping change in drug laws as a societal mistake they don’t want to import from the West.

Regardless of your stance on the legalization of marijuana, if you live in Alabama you’re not going to be able to legally buy pot here for recreational use anytime soon, if ever. Twenty states and the District of Columbia allow some form of medical marijuana sales, but none are in the South, either.

So, from afar we’ll watch this experiment and see if Colorado and Washington are trendsetters or oddities such as Nevada, where prostitution is legal in a few counties. If it proceeds, it may become yet another marked difference between America’s divergent regions.
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