HOT BLAST: A Nevada rancher's 15 minutes of fame
Apr 24, 2014 | 61 views |  0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev., on April 18. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)
Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev., on April 18. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)
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It's understandable why conservatives' brief fling with Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy appears to be over now that video has surfaced of him making racist statements to reporters last weekend.

You can find the video here, but be forewarned: Bundy makes several offensive and racist comments.

What's interesting is that even right-wing radio pundit Sean Hannity has ditched his support of the rancher, who is facing off with the government over the right to graze his cattle on government-owned land. Republican Sens. Rand Paul and Dean Heller have also spoken out against Bundy's comments.

Hannity called Bundy's comments "repugnant," but, according to Talking Points Memo, he then began criticizing -- you guessed it -- Democrats over how the situation has been handled.

"They (Democrats) want to say that conservatives are racist. Conservatives hate women," Hannity said. "Conservatives want old people to die, granny over the cliff. They want the young people to fend for themselves. They want to poison the air and poison the water."

-- Phillip Tutor
Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev., on April 18. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)
Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev., on April 18. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)
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Alabama football: Black ready to break out at receiver
by Marq Burnett
mburnett@annistonstar.com
Apr 24, 2014 | 284 views |  0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Alabama wide receiver Chris Black (5) dives for more yards against Georgia State linebacker Kight Dallas. (Photo by Trent Penny/The Anniston Star)
Alabama wide receiver Chris Black (5) dives for more yards against Georgia State linebacker Kight Dallas. (Photo by Trent Penny/The Anniston Star)
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TUSCALOOSA -- In his second year in the program and having not played many meaningful snaps, Alabama wide receiver Chris Black became frustrated. Black, a former four-star recruit, redshirted in 2012 because of an injury, but expected to push for playing time in 2013. However, with a log jam at his position last season, Black played almost always in mop-up duty. “Of course, it was frustrating,” Black said. “The coaches understood. It was a depth thing. It wasn’t anything I took personally. I still came out and did what I had to do every day in practice.” Black enrolled early along with fellow receiver Amari Cooper in 2012. Black put up impressive numbers in the Tide’s scrimmages and appeared to be heading for a prominent role in his first season, but a hit from teammate Ryan Anderson in an August practice sidelined Black all season with a shoulder injury. Heading into his third season with the Tide, Black has found new life as key players ahead of him on the depth chart have completed their eligibility. While Alabama returns Cooper and seniors Christion Jones and DeAndrew White at receiver, the Tide lost Kenny Bell and Kevin Norwood. Black hopes to fill one of those roles. “I feel I was a lot more focused (this offseason),” Black said. “I didn’t worry too much about making mistakes as much. Just focused on my game and focused on the good things I can do.” With White out as he recovered from toe surgery, Black was one of the top three receivers with Cooper and Jones this spring. During the A-Day Game this past Saturday, Black was the leading receiver for both teams with three receptions for 78 yards and a touchdown. On his score, Black showcased why many consider him one of the most explosive players on the team with the ball in his hands. He ran a short slant route and turned it into a 55-yard touchdown after breaking a tackle. “He’s something awful to cover, too,” Tide safety Jarrick Williams said. “He’s pretty good. Quick. He’s a shifty slot guy. He can do it all.” When White returns, he likely will push Black to the fourth receiver spot, but with new offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin coming in, the personnel groupings aren't clear at this point. What makes Black different than other receivers? “Being versatile. I can be in the slot or outside,” Black said. “I’ve really made a lot of progress playing outside this spring with DeAndrew White being out; taking more reps outside than I’ve done in the past.” Contact Anniston Star Sports Writer Marq Burnett mburnett@annistonstar.com. On Twitter: @Marq_Burnett.
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks in Ellijay, Ga., on Wednesday prior to a signing ceremony for House Bill 60, legislation expanding where people with licenses to carry can bring their guns in Georgia. (AP Photo/Chattanooga Times Free Press, John Rawlston)
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks in Ellijay, Ga., on Wednesday prior to a signing ceremony for House Bill 60, legislation expanding where people with licenses to carry can bring their guns in Georgia. (AP Photo/Chattanooga Times Free Press, John Rawlston)
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HOT BLAST: Georgia, Alabama's neighbor, and its "Nut State" nickname
Apr 24, 2014 | 239 views |  0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks in Ellijay, Ga., on Wednesday prior to a signing ceremony for House Bill 60, legislation expanding where people with licenses to carry can bring their guns in Georgia. (AP Photo/Chattanooga Times Free Press, John Rawlston)
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks in Ellijay, Ga., on Wednesday prior to a signing ceremony for House Bill 60, legislation expanding where people with licenses to carry can bring their guns in Georgia. (AP Photo/Chattanooga Times Free Press, John Rawlston)
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On Wednesday, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal made it legal to carry guns in places such as schools, bars and churches in that state.

As if on cue, critics of Deal's signature have skewered the governor for signing a bill they feel will do little except make it easier for bad guys to do bad things and, in turn, cause more gun-related violence.

Deal told the press that “people who follow the rules can protect themselves and their families from people who don’t follow the rules. The Second Amendment should never be an afterthought. It should reside at the forefronts of our minds.” Depending on your stance on guns and gun rights, you either agree with Deal or think the law is a recipe for trouble.

Nevertheless. here's one of the byproducts of bills such as Georgia's.

The Washington Post's Ann Telnaes has published an online animated political cartoon titled, "Georgia: The Nut State," claiming that "mixing guns and alcohol is not a good idea." Suffice it to say the cartoon isn't kind to Georgia's law.

The most radical of the gun laws that made an appearance in the Alabama Legislature this year didn't become law. But in Georgia, residents there are now living with national opinions such as The Post's -- which may not jive with a majority of Georgia voters but is nonetheless unattractive.

-- Phillip Tutor
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