Alpine native finds peace singing gospel
by Erin Williams
Special to The Star
Feb 24, 2012 | 2692 views |  0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Alpine native Amy Holcomb recently released her first gospel album, ‘Wooden Cross.’ Photo: Special to The Star
Alpine native Amy Holcomb recently released her first gospel album, ‘Wooden Cross.’ Photo: Special to The Star
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For Amy Holcomb, the road to singing gospel music has been one she has navigated since she was 5 years old, when she sang her first church solo in the choir.

“When I had this crowd’s attention — I knew right then that’s what I wanted to do,” the Alpine native remembers. As an adult, Holcomb continued to sing and gain a few fans, but never had anything to give them with her music on it. So when a country music opportunity presented itself in 2009, she naturally jumped on it.

But it wasn’t where she was meant to be.

“I wanted to produce an album, and I wanted to get my name out, but I think I was doing it for the wrong reason,” she said. “I loved the music and everything that I was doing, but I felt like something was still missing.”

With mixed feelings about the type of music she should be singing, she turned to a higher power.

“I just would pray about it and [think], ‘If this is what I need to do, then I will pursue this country album, but I’m still going to sing in the choir, but if you want me to do something else ... and right when I prayed that prayer, I came up with my first song that’s on my album,” Holcomb says.

That stroke of divine intervention was all she needed to begin placing the framework for Wooden Cross, her first publicly released album, for which she wrote nearly every song. The title track, focused on Christ’s forgiveness, set Holcomb’s perspective on what she feels will be the future of her work.

“That’s the [song] where I really found out this is what I’m going to be doing with my life. I’m going to be writing music, and I’m going to be spreading it through my ministry,” she said.

Things have since worked out smoothly for the wife and mother, who now resides in Sylacauga, where she attends Westview Baptist Church. While Holcomb would love to take her work to an international level, she is putting her faith in God and enjoying the fruits of her labor.

“With me trying to do my gospel music … it’s like everything just falls into place,” she said. She said she could even feel his presence as she gave this interview. “My kids can sometimes get very rowdy, but they are behaving right now because this is what I’m supposed to be doing.”

While she is focused on building up her gospel base, Holcomb wouldn’t rule out a return to country music down the road.

“I don’t write [country], but I wouldn’t mind singing someone else’s music. If they were a country listener and then they heard me, I think they would probably respect me singing my gospel music and might go, ‘Hey, I might not be where I need to be, but I can feel this in the country and gospel ’cause it’s OK.’”

And even though she is not yet a superstar, Holcomb’s music is starting to speak for itself.

“About two Sundays ago, this guy came up to me and said ‘Hey, can you please sing that song — I don’t know who wrote it — but can you sing this song?’ and I’m like ‘That’s my song.’”

Holcomb will hold signings from 1 p.m.-3 p.m. at The Amen Corner in Childersburg on March 10 and at Lou Belle’s in Sylacauga on March 24.
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Alpine native finds peace singing gospel by Erin Williams
Special to The Star

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