“Surreal” was the word of 2016, according to the fine folks at Mirriam-Webster. The Oxford dictionary was in the same ballpark, deciding “post-truth” was the 2016 winner, with “woke” and “alt-right” also in the running.

The same advances in technology that allow these words to be written practically anywhere and read practically anywhere are part of a larger movement that puts serious pressure on the nation’s economy, particularly when it comes to factory jobs.

In June, the Trump campaign informed The Washington Post that its reporters were no longer welcome to cover its candidate. Their credentials to cover Trump events were rescinded.

Following Tuesday’s election, two Alabama natives were on my mind. Both will likely play a role as President-elect Donald Trump takes office in January, one likely inside the administration and the other likely challenging it from within the halls of Congress.

In the days after the 1976 presidential election, a few of my elementary school classmates were in a panic. Surely channeling concerns raised by their parents, these boys feared newly elected president Jimmy Carter would soon initiate the mass confiscation of firearms.

Generals are always fighting the last war, goes the old saying. It’s a truism that I expect is being played out by national Democrats and Republicans looking forward to the 2020 presidential primaries.

A colorful Texas lawyer who was long ago hired to persuade authorities to allow for the creation of a university in a remote western part of the Lone Star state, famously declared that “there is enough ignorance in Odessa to justify an eight-year college.”

About 30 minutes into last Monday’s presidential debate, a former U.S. prosecutor took to social media to praise Donald Trump for his aggressive tone with Hillary Clinton.

In April, one of the greatest sportswriters of his generation died at age 96. For decades, Blackie Sherrod entertained Texas newspaper readers. On Sundays, he offered a “Scattershooting” column that was a collection of quick observations. Think of a Twitter account in print form.

In almost every single way, Tom Wolfe’s 1987 novel The Bonfire of the Vanities is far superior to the movie version. Well, that’s my opinion, and the awful box office results from the 1990 film adaptation back me up on this.

Alabama Press Association conventions are like church to me. Granted, it’s a church with a cash bar, a steady supply of politicians pressing the flesh and newspaper folk who excel at witty banter and storytelling.